How PPACA Will Affect Your Business The Next 5 Years?

Tod Covert  By Todd Covert, Executive Vice President of ACA Track

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) – also known as the Affordable Care Act or ACA – is the landmark health reform legislation passed by the 111th Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama in March 2010. The legislation includes a long list of health-related provisions that began taking effect in 2010 and will “continue to be rolled out over the next four years.” Key provisions are intended to extend coverage to millions of uninsured Americans, to implement measures that will lower health care costs and improve system efficiency, and to eliminate industry practices that include rescission and denial of coverage due to pre-existing.

What does it mean for business today?

Business With 50-99 Employees 2015

Key Point #1

Navigating through transition relief to determine the date you need to make sure you are in compliance.

Applicable large employers (ALEs) with fewer than 100 full-time employees, including full-time equivalent employees, may have until 2016 to offer health insurance to eligible employees and their dependents without facing penalties.

This transition relief is available to employers who can certify that they have not reduced their workforce to remain under the threshold and have not materially reduced or eliminated health coverage previously offered. This certification needs to be included with your filing under Section 6056 for 2015.

The IRS will still grant transition relief to employers who reduced their workforce for “bona fide” business reasons.

Key Point #2

If you are over 50 FTE (Full-Time Equivalents) or part of a control group (Parent Company) with more than 50 FTE than you MUST file the 1095-C and 1094-C even if you do not offer coverage.

Key Point #3

Don’t “expect” your payroll company to complete these 1094-C and 1095-C forms.

Why?  Most payroll companies don’t even track the information required to complete these new IRS forms—It is more a benefit enrollment and plan design function than payroll.

  1. Dates of hire and waiting periods determine when employees are in the limited assessment period. Partial months are treated uniquely differently than full months and the series coded will change. Most payroll vendors only track deductions.
  1. Termination, rehire dates and class changes impact offer of coverage and safe harbor designations. Employees with a number of changes during the year can see a variety of different codes appearing on form 1095. Not a payroll function
  1. Offer of coverage determines whether 70% (2015) and 95% (2016) levels are reached or significant penalties are to be paid. Not a payroll function
  1. Safe harbor designations and income drive affordability calculations. Not a payroll function
  1. Transition relief provides the ability to mitigate risk and avoid penalties altogether.  Not a payroll function

Key Point #4

Start balancing culture and cost now because the “Cadillac Tax” is on the horizon in 2018—It’s not a matter of “IF” we hit the Cadillac Tax it’s a matter of “When” we hit the Cadillac Tax.

If health insurance exceeds $10,200 in premiums for an individual or $27,500 for a family. The tax amounts to 40 percent of the cost above that threshold AND its Non-Tax Deductible.

Why do we say “When” we hit the Cadillac Tax?  The insurance cost threshold ($10,200 in premiums for an individual or $27,500 for a family) only increases at CPI each year which is about 3.1% and Healthcare inflation increases close to 8.0% thus the X & Y axis lines are eventually going to cross.

Please join us September 29th for Women Accessing Capital: 5 Things You Need to Know About the New 1094-C and 1095-C IRS Reporting. Register now! 

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